Ready for iOS 12? If You Connect to VPN, Maybe Not

Sep 14, 2018

Home » Digital Workplace » Ready for iOS 12? If You Connect to VPN, Maybe Not
Apple recently announced the release of their new operating system for iPhones and iPads, iOS 12. The company says that it will be available beginning Monday, September 17. Before you download it on your device, though, consider first that it may impact your ability to connect to the Northeastern University VPN. Below is a note from Palo Alto Networks, the vendor that provides Northeastern’s VPN software GlobalProtect:
  • Apple is expected to release iOS 12 shortly. GlobalProtect versions 4.1.x and older are not compatible with this software version.
  • GlobalProtect App 5.0 will be available soon on the Apple App Store and will fully support iOS 10, 11 and 12.
  • There may be a short period of time between the availability of iOS 12 and GlobalProtect 5.0 becoming available on the app store.
  • We advise users to delay upgrading to iOS 12 until GlobalProtect 5.0 is available and installed.
NOTE: We recommend that when GlobalProtect app 5.0 is available, iOS 12 users uninstall GlobalProtect app 4.1.x before installing GlobalProtect app 5.0 on their iOS endpoints.
We recommend that if you connect to the Northeastern VPN from your iPhone or iPad, wait to download iOS 12 until you are able to install the GlobalProtect 5.0 app. Northeastern ITS will keep you updated on when the new version is available.

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